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There is a relationship that exists between surfing and journalism – if you can call it that – that isn’t there with skateboarding or snowboarding. The romanticism, the solitude, the discovery that surfing culture was built on and is it’s greatest attribute allows surfing to exist on a different internal plane. Perhaps the best surf book every written, Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life by William Finnegan, dove into all these topics and it ended up with a Pulitzer. It’s not the only game in town though. The story of Walter Coker mirrors it in many ways.

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Sample:

Even today, there are stretches of coastline on the island that Coker isn’t sure anyone has explored. On his most recent trip in January, which marked 40 years since his first, he found nooks he hadn’t yet surfed himself, which begged the question: had anyone? “There’re still secrets out there,” he confided.

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Click to THE SURFERS JOURNAL for the tale of surfing, discovery, and journalism about Walter Coker

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