Surfing Offshore Slabs In The Predation Cycle Of Great Whites | “… they were able to identify 532 individual white sharks in the surrounding waters.”

 

When you get chills reading about a wave you know the writer is talented. Craig Jarvis has forever put us off surfing this left-hand slab in South Africa.

 

Sample:

The sky was gray and reflected in the water. The morning was bitterly cold and foreboding, a day better suited to sitting around a fire. The offshore wind carried a bite and the swell surged. I was petrified.

I took my 7’2″ out of the truck with trembling hands. It was a great board—thick and fast, made for the kind of big, hollow waves I was looking at. At that moment, though, I hated it. Its existence removed all excuses. The only way out was self-admitted cowardice, which I couldn’t face.

The wave itself was a left-hand slab, throwing out barrels. It was far offshore and the approach entailed a crawling paddle over thick weed, then a long slog in a deep-water channel before alighting next to the reef. While the swell looked a very heavy 6- to 8-feet, it wasn’t the waves that had me so terrified. It was that this slab was located along the sharkiest stretch of coast in South Africa, near one of the most notorious white shark cage diving locations in the world.

 

 

 

Click to THE SURFERS JOURNAL for No Man’s Land

 

 

 

 

 

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