Kelly Slater has been busy playing God with his artificial wave that sent a “shock wave” through surfing. Matt Warshaw was right when he said that surfing history will be looked back upon as pre-KS Wave and post-KS wave. It’s impact, though not yet, will be that powerful.

But you know all this so why are we boring you with more dull news about Kelly’s wave in the middle of a farm field. Well, because the g.o.a.t himself – William Finnegan – wrote about it for The New Yorker. You know William, not so arguably the best writer/surfer of all time who wrote the greatest surf memoir of all time; Barbarian Days.

Sample:

Matt Warshaw, surfing’s unofficial historian, says that the sport now has only two eras, Before Kelly’s Wave and After. It did feel as if something basic had changed—as if technology had, improbably, outdone nature. Still, the artificial wave was not met with universal acclaim. Many surfers felt that the future suddenly had a dystopian cast—mechanized, privatized, soulless. Yes, surfing might now become “mainstream,” with Slater’s magic wave reproduced in pools across the planet, but that is the last thing that most actual surfers want. The critics saw our pointless, difficult, obsessive pastime becoming exponentially more popular, and beloved home breaks ruined by terminal overcrowding. At the same time, there was virtually no one who surfs who didn’t ache to ride it.

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Click to THE NEW YORKER for Kelly Slater’s Shock Wave

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