Is the day of reckoning coming for skateboarding? Will the term “skater” soon be as singularly describable as with “prep” or “jock”? You can already buy your way into the look for just a couple bucks with Supreme or Thrasher fugazi’s. Pretty soon the fakes won’t even need legit names on them.

Sample:

“Skateboarding is plastered just about everywhere you look. It’s in major motion pictures, on TV, inside expensive stores, and on your cell phone at every waking moment.

Skateboarding has experienced waves of trendiness before (think ’80s Back To The Future or ’00s “Sk8er Boi”), but one of the biggest differences today is that the high-end fashion world has adopted it as an entire aesthetic.

Now, consumers are buying skate-inspired goods from brands like Burberry and Louis Vuitton rather than goods from actual skate brands like they did in the 2000s. As such, the brands profiting most from skateboarding’s trendiness aren’t skate brands, but outsiders drawing from our culture.

So this got us wondering. When did non-skate brands decide it was a good idea to use skateboarding as a marketing ploy? And, how much longer can this nonsense possibly go on?”

“If Piroddi is correct, “skateboarding” may have transcended its trendiness phase and become fully embedded into the mainstream as a basic style people can subscribe to. “Skater” has become a blanket term to refer to a certain look, the same way you might describe someone as being “preppy” or a “jock.”

So we may continue to see non-skateboarders try to apply a skateboarding veneer to their outfits and personalities, but they won’t be doing so wearing real Vans and Thrasher tees. As consumers do this, they may even forget the names of the skate brands they’re taking their inspiration from.”

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Click to JENKEM for How Much Longer Can Skateboarding Stay Trendy? 

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